City of Inglewood Governmental Facts
ABOUT THE CITY

With more than ninety years of recorded history, Inglewood continues to live up to the old saying, "Living is good in Inglewood." Surrounded by a sprawling metropolis, Inglewood preserves its identity as one of the finest places to live, with a city government of distinction.

Outstanding facilities are available to a more than 117,000 people living in Inglewood. There are over 100 acres of parks, outstanding recreational facilities and a modern Civic Center. The civic complex features a 12-story City Hall, Emergency Operations Center, Fire Station, City Service Center, Police Building, Main Library, L.A. County Municipal Court and other County buildings. More than 850 full-time equivalent employees are on duty to maintain high quality community services.

Founded in 1887 by Daniel Freeman, incorporated as a general law city in 1908, and chartered by a vote of its people in 1926, Inglewood has a city government whose development has kept pace with the growth of the City.

POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION

Inglewood is a charter city of the State of California. This means that the basic law of the City is set down in a Municipal Charter ratified by the people of our city and approved by the state government. This charter enumerates the fields in which the City may govern itself, the principal officials of the city government, and outlines the basic duties of various officials of the city government.

The city charter also sets forth the services and operations, which the city government provides for residents. The principal activities are police and fire protection, public services (streets, roads, sewers storm drains, sanitation, etc.), water supply, building inspection (inspection and control of public and private buildings for the protection of the residents), parks and recreation programs, and libraries.

The City of Inglewood is governed by a City Council of five representatives. One representative is elected in each of the City's four council districts. The City at-large elects the fifth member, the Mayor. Other officers who are elected from the city at-large are the City Clerk and the City Treasurer. City Council representatives are elected to four-year terms on a staggered basis every two years.

It is the primary responsibility of the City Council to set the policies, which are carried out by the City Administrator and his staff. The City Council, by enacting these policies, is concerned with all municipal activities. Toward this end, the Council meets weekly to enact laws, formulate policies and authorize programs that will best serve the needs of the citizens. The City Council meets on Tuesday evenings, beginning at 7:00 p.m..  Meetings are open to the public and convened in the City Council Chambers of the City Hall, One Manchester Boulevard, Inglewood, California.

The Mayor, representing the entire City at large, presides at all meetings of the City Council, signs all official documents, such as contracts, ordinances, and resolutions. He is the official representative of the City on such county and area-wide groups as the Sanitation District, League of California Cities, National League of California Cities, and the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Other members of the City Council also serve as representatives to groups within, as well as outside the City. Such groups are the Los Angeles County Division of the League of California Cities, the South Bay Cities Association, Southern California Association of Governments, the Inglewood Chamber of Commerce and other municipal organizations.

In order to carry on the day-to day-business of the City in the most efficient and professional manner, the Mayor and the City Council employ a City Administrator whose position is authorized by the City Charter. Each agency head is responsible to the City Administrator for the activities of his or her agency. In turn, the City Administrator is responsible to the City Council for all programs, services and operations. The City Council is responsible to the people of the City.

This hierarchy of responsibilities ensures that the City government carries out the wishes of the majority of the people of the City of Inglewood. This responsiveness to the will of the people forms the basis of local democracy.

CITIZEN ADVISORY COMMISSIONS

The advisory commissions made up of civic-minded residents review several functional areas of the municipal government. The Mayor with the advice and consent of the City Council appoints the citizens who serve on these commissions. Their services have been invaluable on the following advisory commissions: Library, Parks and Recreation, Planning and Zoning, Construction Appeals, Parking and Traffic, Aviation and Human Affairs